Hello. It looks like you are visiting us from outside USA. Please choose which Amazon storefront you would like to use.
Categories

Tag : History

The Silk Roads

by
About
The Book
This epic, magisterial work illuminates how the Silk Roads -the crossroads of the world, the meeting place of East and West -perhaps more than anything else, shaped global history over the past two millennia. It was on the Silk Roads that East and West first encountered each other through trade and conquest, leading to the spread of ideas, cultures, and religions, and it was the appetites for foreign goods that drove economies and the growth of nations. Peter Frankopan realigns the world, orienting us eastward, and illuminating how even the rise of the West five hundred years ago resulted from its efforts to gain access to and control of these Eurasian trading networks. In an increasingly globalized planet, where current events in Asia and the Middle East dominate the world's attention, this magnificent work of history is very much a work of our times.

The Silk Roads

by Peter Frankopan
About
The Book
This epic, magisterial work illuminates how the Silk Roads -the crossroads of the world, the meeting place of East and West -perhaps more than anything else, shaped global history over the past two millennia. It was on the Silk Roads that East and West first encountered each other through trade and conquest, leading to the spread of ideas, cultures, and religions, and it was the appetites for foreign goods that drove economies and the growth of nations. Peter Frankopan realigns the world, orienting us eastward, and illuminating how even the rise of the West five hundred years ago resulted from its efforts to gain access to and control of these Eurasian trading networks. In an increasingly globalized planet, where current events in Asia and the Middle East dominate the world's attention, this magnificent work of history is very much a work of our times.
Recommended By
What Dominic Barton says

Frankopan’s history of the Silk Road is a wide-ranging and incisive history of a region that has been and will be incredibly important, economically and culturally, for the world. The ‘re-rise’ of Asia and China’s One Belt, One Road initiative make this an especially timely account.

SPQR

by
About
The Book
A sweeping, revisionist history of the Roman Empire. World-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even two thousand years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty.

SPQR

by Mary Beard
About
The Book
A sweeping, revisionist history of the Roman Empire. World-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even two thousand years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty.
Recommended By
What Peter Frankopan says

I absolutely loved Mary Beard’s SPQR. It is a sparkling book that brings the past to life. I remember feeling like I’d been electrocuted the first time I went to one of Beard’s lectures at Cambridge many years ago — and this book provides the same thrill and excitement. Glorious.

The Mantle of Command

by
About
The Book
A dramatic, eye-opening account of how FDR took personal charge of the military direction of World War II. Based on years of archival research and interviews with the last surviving Roosevelt aides and family members, this books offers a radical new perspective on FDR’s masterful — and underappreciated — leadership of the Allied war effort. The Mantle of Command is an intimate, sweeping look at a great President in history’s greatest conflict.

The Mantle of Command

by Nigel Hamilton
About
The Book
A dramatic, eye-opening account of how FDR took personal charge of the military direction of World War II. Based on years of archival research and interviews with the last surviving Roosevelt aides and family members, this books offers a radical new perspective on FDR’s masterful — and underappreciated — leadership of the Allied war effort. The Mantle of Command is an intimate, sweeping look at a great President in history’s greatest conflict.
Recommended By
What Bob Iger says

I’ve enjoyed several books this year (2015) that I would count among my favorites, but the one that’s left the deepest impression is Nigel Hamilton’s “The Mantle of Command,”which looks at a defining period in the life of President Franklin Roosevelt—the first year of World War II. Mr. Hamilton has created a masterpiece that is the counterpoint, in many ways, to Winston Churchill’s well-known “The Second World War” series, which painted a heroic portrait of the charismatic prime minister. FDR never had the chance to pen his own autobiographical account of the war, and history has sometimes portrayed him as something of a bystander to the war. Mr. Hamilton corrects this misperception, detailing Roosevelt’s wise tactics for slowly building up America’s military forces and showing how he had to go around the backs of his own advisers to ready the U.S. for its entrance into battle. What emerges is a portrait of Roosevelt not only as a truly great leader, but an excellent strategist and commander.

The Wright Brothers

by
About
The Book
David McCullough, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, tells the surprising, profoundly human story of Wilbur and Orville Wright. Far more than a couple of unschooled Dayton bicycle mechanics who happened to hit on success, they were men of exceptional courage and determination and of far-ranging intellectual interests and ceaseless curiosity, much of which they attributed to their upbringing. In this thrilling book, McCullough draws on the immense riches of the Wright Papers, including private diaries, notebooks, scrapbooks and more than a thousand letters from private family correspondence to tell the human side of the Wright Brothers' story, including the little-known contributions of their sister, Katharine, without whom things might well have gone differently for them.

The Wright Brothers

by David McCullough
About
The Book
David McCullough, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, tells the surprising, profoundly human story of Wilbur and Orville Wright. Far more than a couple of unschooled Dayton bicycle mechanics who happened to hit on success, they were men of exceptional courage and determination and of far-ranging intellectual interests and ceaseless curiosity, much of which they attributed to their upbringing. In this thrilling book, McCullough draws on the immense riches of the Wright Papers, including private diaries, notebooks, scrapbooks and more than a thousand letters from private family correspondence to tell the human side of the Wright Brothers' story, including the little-known contributions of their sister, Katharine, without whom things might well have gone differently for them.
Recommended By
What Sundar Pichai says

David McCullough’s The Wright Brothers is a story about two brothers and one incredible moment in American history. But it’s also a story that resonates with anyone who believes deeply in the power of technology to change lives—and the resistance some have to new innovations.

 

How Music Got Free

by
About
The Book
A riveting story of obsession, music, crime, and money, featuring visionaries and criminals, moguls and tech-savvy teenagers. It’s about the greatest pirate in history, the most powerful executive in the music business, a revolutionary invention and an illegal website four times the size of the iTunes Music Store. Journalist Stephen Witt traces the secret history of digital music piracy, from the German audio engineers who invented the mp3, to a North Carolina compact-disc manufacturing plant where factory worker Dell Glover leaked nearly two thousand albums over the course of a decade, to the high-rises of midtown Manhattan where music executive Doug Morris cornered the global market on rap, and, finally, into the darkest recesses of the Internet. Through these interwoven narratives, Witt has written a thrilling book that depicts the moment in history when ordinary life became forever entwined with the world online—when, suddenly, all the music ever recorded was available for free. An irresistible never-before-told story of greed, cunning, genius, and deceit, this isn’t just a story of the music industry—it’s a must-read history of the Internet itself.

How Music Got Free

by Stephen Witt
About
The Book
A riveting story of obsession, music, crime, and money, featuring visionaries and criminals, moguls and tech-savvy teenagers. It’s about the greatest pirate in history, the most powerful executive in the music business, a revolutionary invention and an illegal website four times the size of the iTunes Music Store. Journalist Stephen Witt traces the secret history of digital music piracy, from the German audio engineers who invented the mp3, to a North Carolina compact-disc manufacturing plant where factory worker Dell Glover leaked nearly two thousand albums over the course of a decade, to the high-rises of midtown Manhattan where music executive Doug Morris cornered the global market on rap, and, finally, into the darkest recesses of the Internet. Through these interwoven narratives, Witt has written a thrilling book that depicts the moment in history when ordinary life became forever entwined with the world online—when, suddenly, all the music ever recorded was available for free. An irresistible never-before-told story of greed, cunning, genius, and deceit, this isn’t just a story of the music industry—it’s a must-read history of the Internet itself.
Recommended By
What Lionel Barber says

Stephen Witt tells of how technology in the form of the MP3 digital format brought the music industry to its knees. His book is a tour de force, delving into the criminal underworld of hackers and pilferers as well the complacent corporate boardroom.

About
The Book
Written four hundred years before the birth of Christ, this detailed contemporary account of the long life-and-death struggle between Athens and Sparta stands an excellent chance of fulfilling its author's ambitious claim. Thucydides himself (c.460-400 BC) was an Athenian and achieved the rank of general in the earlier stages of the war. He applied thereafter a passion for accuracy and a contempt for myth and romance in compiling this factual record of a disastrous conflict.
About
The Book
Written four hundred years before the birth of Christ, this detailed contemporary account of the long life-and-death struggle between Athens and Sparta stands an excellent chance of fulfilling its author's ambitious claim. Thucydides himself (c.460-400 BC) was an Athenian and achieved the rank of general in the earlier stages of the war. He applied thereafter a passion for accuracy and a contempt for myth and romance in compiling this factual record of a disastrous conflict.
Recommended By
What Benedict Evans says

This is one of the best military history books of all time. Thucydides more or less invented impartial, accurate history as we know it, and gives a detailed account of the defining struggle of Classical Greece.

About
The Book
Carlota Perez draws upon Schumpeter's theories of the clustering of innovations to explain why each technological revolution gives rise to a paradigm shift and a "New Economy" and how these "opportunity explosions", focused on specific industries, also lead to the recurrence of financial bubbles and crises. These findings are illustrated with examples from the past two centuries: the industrial revolution, the age of steam and railways, the age of steel and electricity, the emergence of mass production and automobiles, and the current information revolution/knowledge society.
About
The Book
Carlota Perez draws upon Schumpeter's theories of the clustering of innovations to explain why each technological revolution gives rise to a paradigm shift and a "New Economy" and how these "opportunity explosions", focused on specific industries, also lead to the recurrence of financial bubbles and crises. These findings are illustrated with examples from the past two centuries: the industrial revolution, the age of steam and railways, the age of steel and electricity, the emergence of mass production and automobiles, and the current information revolution/knowledge society.
Recommended By
What Marc Andreessen says

Best historical examination of how important new technologies impact the economy, and one of two books that have best predicted the evolution of the US economy the last 6 years.

About
The Book
Award-winning scholar Brian Catlos puts us on the ground in the Mediterranean world of 1050-1200. We experience the sights and sounds of the region just as enlightened Islamic empires and primitive Christendom began to contest it. We learn about the siege tactics, theological disputes, and poetry of this enthralling time. And we see that people of different faiths coexisted far more frequently than we are commonly told.  
About
The Book
Award-winning scholar Brian Catlos puts us on the ground in the Mediterranean world of 1050-1200. We experience the sights and sounds of the region just as enlightened Islamic empires and primitive Christendom began to contest it. We learn about the siege tactics, theological disputes, and poetry of this enthralling time. And we see that people of different faiths coexisted far more frequently than we are commonly told.  
Recommended By
What Neal Stephenson says

Most reasonably well informed people already know that Spain under the Moors was a vibrant cultural melting pot. This book digs deeper, describing the place in fascinating detail and then moving on to Sicily, Alexandria, and Palestine during the centuries that culminated in the Crusades.