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The Story of the Lost Child

by
About
The Book
This is fourth and final instalment in the famed Neapolitan Novels series that confirms Elena Ferrante as one of the world’s best living storytellers. The series has been characterized as a bildungsroman, or coming-of-age story. The series follows the lives of two perceptive and intelligent girls, Elena Greco and Raffaella Cerullo, from childhood to adulthood as they try to create lives for themselves amidst the violent and stultifying culture of their home– a poor neighborhood on the outskirts of Naples, Italy. Central themes in the novels include: women’s friendship and the shaping of women’s lives by their social milieu, sexual and intellectual jealousy and competition within female friendships and female ambivalence about filial and maternal roles. (From Wikipedia)

The Story of the Lost Child

by Elena Ferrante
About
The Book
This is fourth and final instalment in the famed Neapolitan Novels series that confirms Elena Ferrante as one of the world’s best living storytellers. The series has been characterized as a bildungsroman, or coming-of-age story. The series follows the lives of two perceptive and intelligent girls, Elena Greco and Raffaella Cerullo, from childhood to adulthood as they try to create lives for themselves amidst the violent and stultifying culture of their home– a poor neighborhood on the outskirts of Naples, Italy. Central themes in the novels include: women’s friendship and the shaping of women’s lives by their social milieu, sexual and intellectual jealousy and competition within female friendships and female ambivalence about filial and maternal roles. (From Wikipedia)
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What Michael Moritz says

After turning the last page of  the final volume of Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan quartet, it’s easy to issue a long sigh. Few novelists have ever wrought as fine and intense a portrait of the circles and connections that radiate and intersect with the strains (and occasional joys) of a lifelong relationship between two people. The saga of the principals, Lila and Elena, which began in girlish childhood in the squalor of tenement blocks peopled by hoodlums and shopkeepers scratching out an existence, has drawn to a close amid the disappointments, dashed hopes, volcanic outbursts and ruptured connections of late middle age. Yet between these mordant bookends there exists a work for the ages—filled with finely carved characters, intricately etched plots and the entire spectrum of human emotion—all translated into exquisite English.